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Stain Removal

Stain Removal I

Ice cream Scrape and blot as much as possible first. Sponge with cool water, until no more stain comes out. Washables: For washable garments, apply a laundry pretreatment aid and wash in cool water, then air dry. If the stain is still there, sponge with a 50:50 mix of water and ammonia (except for silk and wool garments) apply laundry pretreatment aid, and wash again. Air dry. If the stain still remains, soak washable garments in a digestant. Dry-clean only: Scrape and blot as much as possible, then sponge with cool water until no more stain comes out. If stain remains, sponge with a 50:50 mix of ammonia and water (except for silk and wool). (more…)

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Stain Removal H

Handbags About 95 percent of handbags can be cleaned (inside and out) using a cloth dampened in mild soap or detergent solution. Wipe dry, taking care not to wet the handbag any more than necessary. The shoulder strap, grip or handle gets the most body contact, so let the solution sit there for a minute to dissolve and eliminate skin oil, hand lotion and perspiration. Never store a leather handbag above or below a plastic one, as the plastic bag will absorb dye from the leather bag and become permanently stained.Evening bags: Beaded bags should be treated with care, as one broken thread can cause you to lose beads. To clean white-beaded bags, dust them with talcum powder and wrap in a folded towel. Leave for 48 hours, then lightly brush off the powder.Fabric: Most can be washed using Eucalan Woolwash and warm water, applied with a cloth. Wipe clean with a damp cloth and air dry.Leather: These require a gentle cleaner, such as saddle soap or a cream leather cleaner, available at any shoe repair shop. Rub in and wipe out using a soft cloth. Buff with a clean cloth.Patent leather: Patent leather scratches very easily, so use a patent leather cleaner and apply it with a slightly damp, very soft cloth.Plastic: Sponge clean with a damp cloth lightly coated with a high quality household soap. Removal the soapy residue with damp cloths. Dry, spray with silicone wax and buff.Straw: Vacuum to remove any dust. If necessary, wipe using a cloth dipped in neutral cleaner solution, then wipe clean with a damp cloth. Hang to dry, but take care to avoid sunlight which will shrink the straw.Suede handbags: Use a suede brush to remove mud and dirt. If the mud or dirt gets worked into the bag, your best bet is to have the bag professionally cleaned by a dry cleaner or wet cleaner. To protect your bag from staining materials, you can spray on suede protector (available at shoe stores or shoe repair stores). There are a couple ways to raise a flattened nap. First, you can rub it lightly with fine sandpaper.      Alternatively, you can lightly steam the bag by holding it over boiling water in a shallow pan (i.e. a frying pan). Dry, then raise the nap with a sponge or suede brush. Do not steam for more than a couple minutes, as prolonged steaming can dissolve adhesives.

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Stain Removal F

Flameproof Garments Do not wash flameproof fabrics in boiling water or with bleach. Wash in cool water, and rinse well. Always use a detergent when washing flameproof garments. If you accidentally wash them in soap, rewash in detergent to restore flame retardency. Flannel Use cool water for any flameproofed flannel items such as pajamas. Sometimes new flannel sheets and pillowcases shed fluff. Until the problem goes away- it normally does after several washings- let the sheets and pillowcases drip dry instead of running them through the spin dry cycle. This won’t totally eliminate shedding, but it will reduce it. (more…)

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Stain Removal E

Embroidered Items. Wash in hand-hot water using a mild detergent. Rinse well, and starch if necessary

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Stain Removal E

Embroidered Items.Wash in hand-hot water using a mild detergent. Rinse well, and starch if necessary

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Stain Removal D

Denim If you need to soak denims, use cool water and an enzyme pre-wash      compound. Detergents Liquid detergents usually do a better job of removing greasy, oily stains, whereas powdered detergents are normally cheaper and better for removing mud and clay. Another advantage of powders is that they are often better at preventing mineral stains from iron and other minerals in the water. Note to environmentally-conscious consumers: leading brand detergents contain a number of undesirable ingredients, and powdered  detergents often contain plastic fillers. Diapers Rinse soiled diapers immediately, and soak in a diaper pail with water 1/2 cup borax or high quality oxygen bleach. When washing, make sure to use a second rinse to make sure all the detergent is removed (babies' skin can be irritated by detergents). Many people find our compact Wonderwash washing machine, which is only $42.95, useful for washing diapers. Digestants Digestants work on the Pac-man principle- the enzymes in them eat the bad guys (stains). Be careful not to use digestants on animal fibers such as wool or silk, or the fabric itself will get digested along with the stain. Doilies Old, fragile or handmade doilies should be gently handwashed in Eucalan Woolwash or another mild laundry detergent. Starch can help doilies keep their shape. Dolls In general, cleaning will not necessarily restore dolls to "new" condition, but it's better than not cleaning them at all. Newer dolls come with cleaning instructions, but if you're unsure, surface washing is recommended for all but the most delicate (and expensive) of dolls. Any doll that walks, talks, or moves in any way or has electrical or mechanical parts should never be submerged in water. Older dolls with bisque or porcelain parts may not have had a sealer applied over the face, and water could wash the paint right off their faces.  To surface wash: Wipe with a sponge dampened in an all-purpose      cleaner solution. For really stained dolls, you can use a soft-bristled toothbrush. Ink often cannot be removed, but can sometimes be bleached out by sunlight. Machine washing: The only dolls that should be washed in an automatic washer are those that say so on the label. These are usually made entirely of cloth, stuffed with polyester or other washable fiber filling. Some dolls' heads can be removed and their clothes run through the washer. Hair care: To wash synthetic and real hair, use a mild shampoo, rinse, and allow it to air-dry. Note that curly hair will not be nearly as      curly after it is wet, and synthetic hair cannot be reset, so unless it's absolutely necessary, avoid washing doll locks. If you know for a fact that a doll's hair is made of human hair or mohair, don't wash it unless you are prepared to redo the hairdo. For tangled hair, use a wig brush. Yarn hair should be washed in Eucalan Woolwash or another woolwashing  detergent. Dry Cleaning Dry cleaning refers to a cleaning process where solvents (usually petroleum solvents) are used instead of water. Fabrics that water might shrink, warp or cause to lose color are usually dry cleaned. Dry cleaning is not dry at all, rather, the clothes are dipped in a solvent. In most cases this solvent is perchlorethylene, or PERC. In 1995 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified PERC in group 2A, meaning that it is probably carcinogenic to humans. Fortunately new techniques such as wet cleaning can be used to effectively wash dry-clean only clothes without the use of hazardous substances such as PERC. Dryers For best results and to prevent fires, clean the lint filter or screen before each load. Lint can also collect in the exhaust duct and inside the rear panel on electric dryers, or around the burner on gas dryers and create a fire hazard (contrary to popular belief, the lint trap does not catch all the lint).These parts of a dryer should be cleaned by a  professional serviceperson every two to three years.

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Stain Removal C

Cashmere Wash carefully by hand, using cool water and a wool-washing detergent such as Eucalan Woolwash. Cashmere should not be wrung, however it can be spin-dried. Chapstick Since chapstick is a petroleum grease based product a good concentrated grease removal product should work like pinesol or citrasolv. Natural Choices has a product called Orange Power which will work well on that kind of stain. Children’s Clothing Many stains can be eliminated by pre-treating or pre-soaking. Comforters Try to avoid washing down comforters, if possible. They should be dry-cleaned, however not every cleaner will accept them due to their weight (for environmentally-conscious consumers, see if you can find a wet cleaner that will take care of these items). If you need to wash them at home due to an emergency or other reason, launder by hand or in a machine using the shortest cycle possible. A good airing will usually freshen up down or feathers, and you can preserve the comforter’s appearance with a new removable cover. Before washing or dry cleaning feather eiderdown, determine whether or not the      covering is sturdy enough to withstand laundering. Feather eiderdowns can tear, and the feathers could clog washing machines or dry cleaning equipment. Use very cool water, as hot water can cause an unpleasant smell by releasing oils in the feathers. Do not machine wash for more than three minutes. Crayon Use Orange Power or other cleaner containing d-limonene. Curry Oxygen bleach products will do an excellent job for you. Curtains Not all curtains can be washed, as washing can cause permanent creasing in some of them.  Tip: an occasional vacuuming will cut down on the number of times you wash them. Make sure to vacuum the tops, where a lot of dust tends to accumulate. Lace curtains: Wash with a delicate cycle, cold water, and a wool-safe detergent, such as Eucalan Woolwash. If made of cotton, hang out to dry. Polyester blends can be machine-dried on a delicate cycle. Ruffled curtains: The key is to avoid overdrying, which causes a lot of wrinkles. For best results, iron and starch cotton ruffles.      Cotton/polyester blends and all synthetic ruffles can be spun dry and hung      to finish drying. Make sure they are fully dried before you tie them back. Tip: Afraid your vacuum has too much suction to avoid "swallowing" curtains? There's a little opening, called an air bleeder, on the of most vacuums which reduces the suction when you open the valve.  Sheers/delicates: These are usually 100 percent polyester, so use      cold water and a delicate cycle when washing. Hang to dry immediately after the spin cycle finishes. Don't put them in the dryer, or you'll get tons of small wrinkles that will never come out.

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Stain Removal B

Baby Clothes You may wish to spray nice outfits with a soil retardant, such as Scotch-gard. This will allow you to wipe off stains before they sink in. Make sure not to wash flame-resistant sleepwear in any soap products. Presoak serious potty stains, using Oxy-Boost or an enzyme detergent. Breast milk stains should be treated in the same manner as potty stains. A paste of unflavored meat tenderizer and cool water can also remove some milk and baby formula stains. Bacteria/Enzyme Digesters Digesters are the most effective method for removing urine, vomit, fecal matter and other organic stains, and the odors associated with them. These digesters contain bacteria which become activated when mixed with warm water, and produce enzymes which eat the organic matter and completely remove it (as opposed to products which just mask the odors).  In our opinion, Odorkill is the best digester on the market. Bleach Not all bleaches are the same. Chlorine bleach does a good job whitening and removing stains from whites and colorfast garments. However, we not not recommend using chlorine bleach, as it has many health and environmental effects (for more information on the dangers of chlorine, click here). Chlorine should never be used on silk, wool, spandex, or on permanent press or flame-retardant fabrics treated with resins. It can weaken fabrics, and cause permanent color loss. For those interested in protecting the environment, we recommend oxygen bleaches such as Oxyboost. Borax Borax is an ingredient in many diaper presoaks products, used to help neutralize the ammonia odor of urine. A mild, natural alkaline salt, borax is used as a preservative and mild deodorizer in laundry products. It can also be added separately.

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Stain Removal A

Acetate Acetate is used for curtains, evening fabrics, lining materials, and as fiber fill for quilts, pillows and mattress pads. Acetate is stain, moth and mildew resistant. However, colors can fade and dyes can run. Most acetates need to be professionally cleaned, and some can be washed as delicates. Acetic Acid Acetic acid is often used in stain removal to neutralize alkaline stains or provide a mild bleaching action. Acetic acid is available at pharmacies and photo stores in a 10 percent solution. White vinegar, a 5 percent solution of acetic acid, can also be used for spot removal. Acetic acid is especially useful because it's safe for silk and wool, which do not tolerate alkaline spotters well. It can be used on cotton and linen if diluted with equal parts water, but test the fabric in an inconspicuous area first. It should not be used on acetate at all. Acid If not treated promptly, alcohol can damage fabrics permanently. Immediately rinse with cold water, flushing the stained area under running water to flush out the acid. Spread the stained area over a towel or pad, and dampen with household ammonia. Repeat several times, placing a new section of the towel or pad under the stained area each time. Finally, rinse under running water. Do not use undiluted ammonia on pure wool or silk, or on blends containing either wool or silk. Afghans Afghans can easily stretch out of shape, especially when wet, so treat them as gently as possible. A wool afghan should be washed by hand using a wool-safe detergent such as Eucalan Woolwash, in cold or lukewarm water. Avoid drying with heat. Air-dry it instead, using the air setting in your dryer. Don't hang it to dry, or your afghan will stretch. Afghans made of acrylic yarn are easier to care for. Using a gentle cycle, machine-wash with warm water. Machine dry on low heat. As with all handmade knits, check to see that all knots are tight before the first wash, so they won't unravel. Alcohol Alcohol has a multitude of uses for stain removal. It's effective on grass stains, indelible pencil, some inks, and a number of dye stains. Pretest first, to make sure alcohol's powerful solvent action won't cause the fabric dye to run. Use either denatured or isopropyl alcohol for cleaning and stain removal (avoid rubbing alcohol, which may contain dyes, perfumes and excess water). Never use alcohol on wool, and always dilute 1:1 with water for use on silk or acetates. Alpaca These yarns and fiber are obtained from the alpaca, a domesticated South American animal that looks like a llama but is a closer relative of the camel. The term alpaca is also used to refer to the fine, silky fibers obtained from llamas, and even for synthetic and synthetic/wool blends that have the luxurious feel of true alpaca. Alpaca is used primarily in tailored suits and coats and for sportswear. Classified as a woolen, it should be cared for like wool, carefully following any care label directions. Ammonia Even a mild solution of ammonia is quite alkaline, so it works well on most acid soils and is a decent grease-cutter. For spot removal, either clear or the chemically pure 10 percent solution available at drugstores is what you want. Ammonia's mild bleaching action makes it useful for removing a wide variety of stains. Ammonia can alter the color of some dyes, so always pretest on fabrics. If a dye change occurs, rinse with water, apply vinegar, then rinse with water again. Do be careful when using ammonia, by storing it out of reach of children, as it's poisonous if swallowed. Don't mix ammonia with chlorine bleach, as doing so creates toxic fumes. Amyl Acetate Also known as banana oil, amyl acetate is a solvent that safely removes nail polish, laquer, and airplane glue from acetates and other fibers that would be damaged by acetone. You can find it at pharmacies- ask for the chemically pure kind. Amyl acetate is flammable, so keep it well away from sparks or flame. Angora Also known as mohair, angora refers to fabrics made from the fine hair of the Angora goat. The term is also used to refer to articles made from Angora rabbit hair, although rabbit hair is not a true woolen. Angora is used alone and in blends to make fancy dress goods such as hats, suits, sweaters and mittens, and for upholstery fabrics. Care for all types of angora fabrics the same way you do for wool. (See "Wool.")

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