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Stain Removal L

Lace


Lace is delicate and needs to be handled carefully. Lace items can be washed by placing them in a jar with lukewarm water and Eucalan Woolwash. First add the water and detergent, then close the lid and shake well to dilute the detergent. Remove the lid, immerse the lace, tighten the lid and shake the jar for 1-2 minutes. Use the same procedures to rinse, minus the detergent. If the lace is very weak, tack it to a white cloth before washing. Spread out the cloth and attached lace to dry. Frail lace curtains can be folded inside a pillowcase Caution: Never use bleach on old lace, as it will weaken the fibers. Also, due to its frail nature lace should never be wrung.  Lace doilies and tablecloths: After washing, dip in a 2:1 mixture of water to liquid starch, roll in a towel to remove excess water, and lay flat on a clean towel. Smooth out into the desired shape, and use stainless steel straight pins to hold in place until dry. Ironing: If ironing is necessary, use a warm iron and and put a press cloth over the lace so the tip of the iron doesn’t catch in the loops. To raise the pattern, press on the wrong side of the lace item.

Leather


Finished leather: Coated with dye on the surface, finished leather is soil resistant and easy to care for. Most spots and spills can be washed off using a damp cloth. Don’t use neatsfoot oil, shoe polish or waxes on finished leather garments. It is a good idea to have your leather garments professionally cleaned at least once a year. Some finished leather garments may have some degree of color, shading and texture changes- your cleaner should let you know what to expect. Suede: Suede has no protective finish, and easily picks up soils and stains. Minor soils and marks can be removed with an eraser, suede brush or even find sandpaper. The only products you can safely use on suede are clear waterproofers Tip: To protect the collar from body oils and makeup, wear a scarf under a leather coat or jacket.

Lined Garments


The best advice is to follow the care label. Many need to be professional cleaned by a dry cleaner or wet cleaner, as machine or hand washing will cause the garment to lose its shape.

Linen


Pure linen is a natural fiber made from flax. Many linen fabrics today are blends of linen and synthetic fibers. To launder, pre-soak for about 10 minutes in warm water and detergent, wash in hot water and detergent, and rinse twice. If you desire a sheen, iron on the right side. To avoid a sheen, iron on the wrong side.

Lint


You can significantly reduce lint in the following ways: Proper sorting. Separate the big lint culprits (towels, sweaters, chenille, flannel, etc.) from garments that pick up lint easily, such as corduroys, permanent press and synthetics. Also, turn garments that pick up lint inside out before washing them with anything. Check pockets before washing, to make sure they don’t contain any tissues. Don’t overfill the washer. Overfilling will cause clothes to rub against each other, causing some garments to pick up lint from others. The lack of space will also make it more difficult for the water to remove lint. Important note: lint from washing machines is a leading cause of septic system failure. If you have a septic system, we strongly recommend you visit (URL) to read more about this problem, and what you can do to eliminate it. Avoid overdrying. Remove clothes from the dryer while they are still slightly damp. Overdrying creates static electricity, which attracts lint. Brush lint off garments when they are still damp, it will be much easier than when the clothes are dry.